Tag: back to basics

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Three Distinct Hearing Aid Programs for Music?

In preparation for a book that will be (hopefully) published in the spring of 2022 called “Music and Hearing Aids” (Plural Publishing, working title), I conducted a literature review of previous research regarding the programming of hearing aids for music.

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A Vocalist Wants a Quiet Space at Home to Practice

I receive many questions from instrumental musicians, vocalists, and performing artists about issues relating to how they should practice. A particularly common question is “How can I modify a room in my house so that my vocal practice doesn’t drive my dog crazy?”

OTC and Observations on the Humes et al Study

Perhaps the most well-read article of 2017 is “The effects of service-delivery model and purchase price on hearing-aid outcomes in older adults: a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial” by Larry Humes and his colleagues at Indiana State University, published in the March 2017 edition of the American Journal of Audiology. Drs Marshall Chasin and Steve Aiken provide their perspectives on this important research.

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Back to Basics: Music Listening and Hearing Aids. Are All Approaches the Same? Stop and Listen.

In the past several years the hearing aid industry has introduced some ingenious solutions to handling the “music and hearing aids” problem. Simply stated, the higher level inputs of music tend to overdrive the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter or “front end” in many hearing aids. Dr Chasin discusses some possible solutions for music listening.

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Back to Basics: Linguistics 101 for Hearing Healthcare Professionals

The Speech Intelligibility Index (or SII) shows some interesting characteristics. The difference between 340 Hz and 3,400 Hz (coincidentally the bandwidth of the telephone) is fairly similar for continuous discourse, whereas there is a high frequency bias for nonsense syllables. That is, whenever there is a context to speech, there is a greater reliance on lower frequency sounds.

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Back to Basics: The Final Element

In the last several years, technologies have become available that have shifted up the maximum input that can be digitized through an A/D converter to over 110 dB SPL. One element—the final element—remains when optimizing a hearing aid for music, and it is surprisingly very “low tech” — a single-channel hearing aid. Dr Chasin discusses its merits for music.

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